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18 replies to this topic

#1 Conman

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 02:49 PM

I was an avid reader since my childhood and I want to incorporate this habit in my young cousins and nephews too. Which author / book / series would you recommend for Children ? When I was young, I couldn't get enough of Enid Blyton but I wont know what kids these days would 'dig' :)
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#2 Rhodes

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 03:09 PM

That's a hard question as I come from a generation that didn't have Internet access growing up. I learned to read from the Around The Corner series which are so politically incorrect now it's not funny. I remembered I enjoyed reading SRA's which were color coded and had captivating stories with questions. Times have changed as has the permissible subject matter taught to our children.
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#3 Deborah1962

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 03:48 PM

I remembered the bible stories book that had rich pictures and simple stories; I went to a thrift store (second hand type) and found 2 very new copies of the large hard bound book (has about 500 pages or so). I purchased one for my son. Mine though was well read, he still has it in reasonable condition and thumbs through the pages for the pictures.
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#4 flame

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 04:38 PM

I loved Willard Price - and my children have also enjoyed those, although they are terribly scientifically inaccurate now. Obviously there is the Harry Potter books - better if the kids haven't seen the films though because the films are pants. I would still give enid blyton a chance - she offers a world as different as the Harry Potter books and I think some kids will still enjoy that
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#5 MaryAnn

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 05:04 PM

flame what does pants mean if you don't mind me asking?

Enid Blyton and Judy Blume where some of the earliest authors I recall. I would say Summer Sisters was my first "grown up" book if we don't count Sweet Valley twins
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#6 kristiane

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 08:41 AM

I always wanted the story of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. The story of this boys are full of adventure the can really give children a lot of excitement and learning. Tom and Huck were friends but Mark Twain written different books about the life adventures of each of them. The old setting of the story reminds me of how the world today differ from the old times and how children enjoy the green grasses, clean rivers, fresh foods, trees, and forest while they are playing compared today that children only play within the limited area of their homes, school, and computers.
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#7 kinser

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 03:19 PM

Two of my favorites from childhood are Where the Red Fern Grows and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. If I really think about it, I'm sure I can come up with a bunch more, as I've always been a reader. Does anyone remember a book called The Wtich Herself? There were two others in that series, too (Witch Water is one, and i can't remember the other). I loved those - I re-reread them many times. I loved The Little House on the Prairie series, anything by Judy Blume, and tons more. I read a bunch of books about horses when I was younger - I've always been horse-crazy.
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#8 angie828

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 01:16 PM

I am not sure what teens are into these days. How young are you talking? I know when I was younger I loved the Boxcar children. These books were the best and I would happily read them. I am not even sure if these books are still around.
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#9 Crinkle

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 05:58 AM

When I was young, my favorite book was Betty Smith's "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn." My nephew is in middle school and fell in love with the Rick Riordan series. He's not an avid reader, and it's the first series that really got his attention. The next volume is coming out in October, so he's looking forward to that one. I've read the first three and am impressed with how they set young people up to enjoy mythology in school. The background is pretty authentic, more so than some of the movies that have come out.
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#10 n87

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 04:38 PM

What ages are the children? If they're young then you can't go wrong with Dr. Seuss.


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#11 TABL

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 05:38 PM

Yes it definitely depends on the ages.  My 5 year olds likes way different books than his 16 year old sister!! 

But really, there are so many good books out there.  I especially love young literature, such as Dr Suess, Sandra Boynton, etc. 

My older kids LOVE the Diary of a Wimpy Kid books.  They are 12 and 14 now, but read them around 10/11.  They are books they read in one sitting! 

My daughter is 16 and loves Sarah Dessen.


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#12 jayant102

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 02:19 AM

As a kid I started out with reading Enid Blyton and then moving on to a few classics like Tom Sawyer. I also read works like Alice in Wonderland and Don Quixote, I am pretty sure kids can read those.

 

After that you can introduce them to Harry Potter books. For all their flaws, these books are still great as gateway reading material.


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#13 westmost

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 04:37 PM

I agree about the ages, a 5 year old and a 10 year old are going to want different things. And obviously even then it depends on the kids.

 

I'd say that especially for the younger set, the age of the book hardly matters, I grew up in the 80s reading all sorts of books that were anywhere from one to a hundred years old. When you're six, you don't know that Peter Rabbit and Winnie the Pooh are from the 1910s and 1920s, you wouldn't care even if you did.

 

So yeah, the classics, especially the illustrated ones, are great for the littler set; Dr. Seuss, Where the Wild Things Are, The Velveteen Rabbit, When We Were Very Young

 

For slightly older kids it's going to depend on what they like, when I graduated to kids books I was wild about animals and science fiction. There was very little SF for kids, so I read a ton of adventure books, especially if there seemed to be a girl in then, like the Blyton series or things like The Borrowers and all of Roald Dahl's weird, wonderful books like the BFG or of course Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. And Gerald Durrell books, as well as Black Beauty, White Fang, The Black Stallion, and anything else that had a picture of an animal anywhere on it, but proceeded pretty quickly to juvenile SF since there wasn't much of a middle-grade genre category then. There were some, though; A Wrinkle in Time, Earthsea, Pern, early Bradbury.

 

Nowadays I'd say Neil Gaiman's kids books are excellent (Coraline, Chu's Day, The Wolves in the Walls), Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events are perfect for slightly precocious, odder children. Olivia by Ian Falconer, and I've also heard good things about the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, although I'm not super familiar with it.

 

Harry Potter usually falls into YA, but I think it is a good series that kids can start at about the same age as the protagonist (11 years old) and grow with, I think.


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#14 wickedshizuku27

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 04:59 PM

In the last few years, the children's book genre has grown to massive proportions. Some really good series to note would be: How to Train Your Dragon by Cressida Cowell, Septimus Heap by Angie Sage, The Sisters Grimm by Michael Buckley , 39 Clues by Rick Riordan and other authors, The Unwanteds Lisa McMann, A Wrinkle in Time by Madilin D'Engle, The Magic Thief by Sarah Prinis, The Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patricia C. Wrede, The Ranger's Apprentice by John Flanagan, The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander, The Books of Umber by P.W. Catanese, and there are so many more. All ranging from about 4th grade up to about 9th grade. Some subject matter in a few series would have to be reviewed by their parents making the final judgement.

For third grade and below you can't go wrong with Mo Williems, Dr. Seuss, Shel Silverstien, or any of the Beranstain books. Scholastic has an excellent mail order system where they send you the books you want for your little ones plus the two they send you for being a member. It kick started my children's reading, and have heard so many good things from other parents that participated in the club. 

Age appropriateness is an important factor in my experience and observations. When not heeded it leads to behavioral problems, then parents have the nerve to wonder why they have such disrespectful kids. Don't let your kids read something you wouldn't, and for that matter take a look at the latest cartoons they're watching as well. Bender from Futurerama puts it very well. If anyone has ever seen that episode.


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#15 VTEC 91244

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 10:15 PM

Don't forget the Harry Potter series, the Sherlock Holmes stories, The Chronicles of Narnia, the Wizard of Oz books, the Xanth series by Piers Anthony is good for a laugh with all those puns and it makes you wonder what magic talent you would have (my mom is a diehard fan), The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings... is Animorphs still popular? I heard that was good but I never actually got into it. Oh, and Hitchhiker's Guide series by Douglas Adams, and his Shada as well, that one's excellent.


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#16 pipergale

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 11:00 AM

For me, I never really saw the Harry Potter series as something that was for kids. I mean some of the imagery in some of the films were very frightening, even to adults. *shrugs* The books were too ordinary for children's books in my opinion though.


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#17 Livvvy

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 02:37 PM

What ages are the children? If they're young then you can't go wrong with Dr. Seuss.

That's a very important question. You don't want to hand them War and Peace at age three, but likewise you don't expect to see them enjoying Green Eggs and Ham as much when they're twelve. They'll still enjoy it-who wouldn't?-just it's not as challenging.


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#18 AllBuffedUp

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 01:59 PM

I loved Harry Potter as a kid, and comic books, and mangas. I loved the narration of Peter Pan, too. I think that people see comics and mangas as lesser form of books (the "I would rather my kid reads novel" thing) but one should not underestimate the power of hooking them on something that would make them want to return again and again to a book store / library.

 

I thik Pippi Longstocking might be another fun idea.


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#19 Sefarad

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Posted 10 April 2015 - 07:06 AM

I loved reading  ''The little prince'' as a kid :)  Totally loved it and to this day this is one of my favorite books,  I know it was kinda old back then and it's even older now, but this kind of books are great for children any age.  Actually I'd like this to be the very first book my kids read.  It's so sweet and innocent... plus it teaches some really valuable lessons.  I love it!


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