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The Classics


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#1 CouchPotato

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 06:25 AM

What is your favorite classic novel? For me, it's Wuthering Heights. I re-read it at least once a year because I love it so much. It is a sad story, but the characters are so well developed that I feel like I know them personally.
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#2 ILoveArcher

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 06:17 PM

While I can appreciate the symbolic impression that Wuthering Heights made on and in the literary world, I have to be honest and say that the story itself is so confusing! There's so much unrequited love that it's enough to drive you into the throes of depression. But of the Bronte sisters, I tend to lean more towards Charlotte with Jane Eyre. It's not the hip-hop-happiest book ever written, but it's one of the first classical books that I can remember reading and have read it and could read it time and time again. It's a timeless piece that always has me cheering for the characters, even though I know the end results.
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#3 Bittersweet

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 06:50 PM

Since these is the classics and rather old, we can talk about the contents.

Jane Eyre is one of the most depressing classics I've ever read. I can take anything but boredom is not one of them. Jane was unbelievably boring. I never got why she liked Rochester or him her. I had high hopes for her but she grew up to become this rather dour person. Figures she'll be drawn to an equally miserable person
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#4 ILoveArcher

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 07:40 PM

Since these is the classics and rather old, we can talk about the contents.

Jane Eyre is one of the most depressing classics I've ever read. I can take anything but boredom is not one of them. Jane was unbelievably boring. I never got why she liked Rochester or him her. I had high hopes for her but she grew up to become this rather dour person. Figures she'll be drawn to an equally miserable person


LOL...I thought I was the only person who had a certain feeling of....distaste for Rochester. I can remember reading the book and asking my mother, all shocked and whatnot how he could get away with locking his legal wife away, regardless of how nutty she was. She fed me some archaic, cock and bull story about how divorce was severely frowned upon in that time period and some people would remain trapped in loveless marriages until one or the other died. But I had such a love and undying loyalty to the character of Jane herself. She possessed a certain kind of strength that I had hoped I would be able to embody. Even if she was a little naive and made bonehead choices in mates. But if the choice was between the polygamist and her cousin, I think I would have had to choose the polygamist too :D
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#5 Bittersweet

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 08:20 PM

He was a dark character, a rather cruel man considering how he treated his first wife. Seeing how she was raised, I never understood how Jane could fall for a guy like him.

My favorite classic is The Count of Monte Cristo. What can I say, I love delicious revenge dishes served by dashing men with heart of gold. Yes, Dant├Ęs wanted all those that set him up to pay but he wasn't all about revenge. He helped the less fortunate with some of his loot
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#6 Wylla

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 06:23 AM

The Count of Monte Cristo is a great book and it's no wonder it's survived, unlike other classics *cough*The Scarlet Letter*cough*.

I'm a big fan of Jane Austen and Charles Dickens. The social commentary in both is really interesting and I love the way both authors write. A good example is in Sense and Sensibility: "Elinor agreed with it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition". I laughed hard at that one; I loved the phrasing and it's a sentiment we've all felt at one time or another about someone we've met.
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#7 ILoveArcher

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 09:02 PM

The Count of Monte Cristo is a great book and it's no wonder it's survived, unlike other classics *cough*The Scarlet Letter*cough*.

I'm a big fan of Jane Austen and Charles Dickens. The social commentary in both is really interesting and I love the way both authors write. A good example is in Sense and Sensibility: "Elinor agreed with it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition". I laughed hard at that one; I loved the phrasing and it's a sentiment we've all felt at one time or another about someone we've met.


OMG!! I forgot about the count!! I could never plan something so perfectly and be able to roll with the punches the way he does. I have a horrible temper and I would totally ruin it. To be able to expertly, and almost through no actions of his own, exact revenge on people that had so unjustly wronged him is fantastic.
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#8 Crinkle

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 07:04 AM

Mr. Rochester was the first man I ever fell in love with. I saw him through Jane's eyes when I was young and impressionable. I love all the books people have listed here, but my favorite classics are by Thomas Hardy. His "Tess of the D'Urbervilles" is my favorite, followed by "Far from the Madding Crowd" and "The Return of the Native."
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#9 opal

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 11:02 AM

Back to Jane Eyre. This is one that I have tried to read several times and can't get past the first couple of chapters. I put it in the same class as
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Bleah, Bleah, Bleah. So little time and so many better books to read than these.
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#10 ShootingBlanks

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 11:32 AM

Many classics are overrated, Jane Eyre is high on the list IMO.
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#11 CouchPotato

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:29 PM

I'll throw another of my favorites into the mix here with Dracula. I actually didn't read Dracula for the first time until several years ago, but once I picked it up I couldn't put it down. Even though I had a general idea of what happens, I was still on the edge of my seat!
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#12 TheMuse

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 03:05 PM

Mine would be "The Scarlet Letter". We were asked to do a critical reading of this Hawthorne novel in a literary class, and the task made me discover and appreciate the artistry and the social commentary behind the literary work. The main character, Hester Prynne, isn't one of your damsels in distress or perfect heroines. She is actually flawed but she represents a universal theme.
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#13 chicken1empanada

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:17 PM

I don't have one classic novel that I can call my favorite because I consider many to be great reads, but I do have favorite authors such as Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and the Bronte sisters. I'm fast becoming a fan of Victor Hugo as I am currently reading the unabridged classic, Les Miserables, partly in preparation for the movie version of the stage musical which will be released this December. It's one of those novels I've always had in my books-to-read-before-I-die list. Plus, I'm a sucker for tales of redemption so rooting for Jean Valjean shouldn't be too hard for me.
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#14 almari011

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Posted 26 October 2012 - 02:35 AM

I'm not really a fan of the classics but I've read many. My favorites are Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Wuthering Heights and Count of Monte Cristo. I've read the books and also watched the movie except for Sense and Sensibility since there's no movie adaptation for that yet.
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#15 chicken1empanada

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 01:12 AM

I've read the books and also watched the movie except for Sense and Sensibility since there's no movie adaptation for that yet.


I believe there is a 1995 movie adaptation of the novel, Sense and Sensibility, directed by Ang Lee and stars Kate Winslet, Emma Thompson, and Hugh Grant to name a few of the actors with whom you may be familiar. Here is the IMDB profile if you're curious to know more. The other adaptation I know of aired in 2009 on PBS's Masterpiece Classics. If you can, try and search for both online or on DVD, and watch them. Tell me what you think...
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#16 wickedshizuku27

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 08:29 PM

Funny enough, I seemed to enjoy King Lear and Hamlet. Do those count as classics, because they came much earlier and were plays?

Another that seems to be looked over is The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle.  I really enjoyed the plot scheme to the story, and I felt a lot nostalgia while reading it.


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#17 AllBuffedUp

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 07:42 PM

I'm happy to see how many people like The Count of Monte Cristo! It stand atop my list, too, such an epic tale of loss and revenge. Did you guys know that Alexandre Dumas, the author, was known for having shadow writers who wrote for him his stories?

 

Also love Cyrano de Bergerac, Rebecca, Pride and Prejudice and A Tale of Two Cities. Among others!


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#18 maladjusted

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 11:09 AM

For me, it's Little Women and Anne of Green Gables.  I read both when I was in my early teens and have re-read them several times since.  Little Women is set in a time that I find interesting and I love that the characters all took such different courses in their life.  It shows strong, imaginative, independent women and really sparked that feeling that I could be whatever I wanted to be.  Anne of Green Gables is just such a fun read - the way she is so melodramatic and always inadvertedly getting into trouble. 


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