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Paranormal Books


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#1 Arya Stark

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 10:37 AM

There are millions of titles and authors out there, if we were to start threads for even a fraction of them, it'll be chaos. Unless they are Twilight/Harry Potter popular, they don't need individual threads

So this is the official paranormal book thread. Authors like Karen Marie Moning, Ilona Andrews and Jeaniene Frost etc. Series as well as stand alones belong here

#2 Bittersweet

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 10:42 AM

I like this. The Literary Nook is getting clustered

I've read the Highlander and Fever books by Karen Marie Moning. I hated the last book in the Fever series, Dreamfever. I just can't see Barrons kicking back and enjoying a hotdog
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#3 Realitytv

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 05:11 AM

I love paranormal books or movies. I think they're so interesting. There are so many true stories out there in books and then transform into movies. I love to read about true stories. I believe in spirits. I think there are paranormal activities out there. If I have a chance I would look at all of them. I think they quench my thirst for the spiritual world. I think the Connecticut haunting is interesting. It was pretty scary for me to recall those things in that story though. 


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#4 cjcassada

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 04:42 PM

I love reading paranormal books, most of the books on my shelves are about ghosts, aliens, and monsters. I like to read about real-life accounts rather than fiction because the real-life encounters are way scarier. One thing that I enjoy about reading paranormal books is learning something new. For instance, I never knew The White House was haunted until I read a book about ghosts of Washington.


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#5 n87

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 09:09 PM

The Dresden Files! I highly recommend it to anybody who's into fantasy and detective books. Basically, Harry Dresden is a detective who also happens to be a wizard, who generally has to solve paranormal crimes. It is pretty gory, so I wouldn't recommend it for the faint of heart. I love how sarcastic Dresden is, too, he's very anti-hero. There are tons of books in the series, check it out.


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#6 wickedshizuku27

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 11:25 PM

The Dresden Files! I highly recommend it to anybody who's into fantasy and detective books. Basically, Harry Dresden is a detective who also happens to be a wizard, who generally has to solve paranormal crimes. It is pretty gory, so I wouldn't recommend it for the faint of heart. I love how sarcastic Dresden is, too, he's very anti-hero. There are tons of books in the series, check it out.

 

Yes I agree. This is a very good series, though I wouldn't say that it is the gore fest I thought it might turn into. Simon R. Green's Nightside is king of the mountain there. There needs to be more series like them. 


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#7 pipergale

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 08:45 AM

I have never read a paranormal series - as far as books - that actually scared me. If you guys were shaken buy any books let me know. I love to be afraid and many films and movies often fail at succeeding in this task lol.


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#8 wickedshizuku27

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 03:21 PM

I have never read a paranormal series - as far as books - that actually scared me. If you guys were shaken buy any books let me know. I love to be afraid and many films and movies often fail at succeeding in this task lol.

Definately the Nightside series. It was pretty sick and twisted. I didn't sleep well for quiet some time. 

Another pretty creepy series from the YA genre would be the Spook's Apprentice series. There were some uncomfortable scenes that had me wondering where the closest bathroom was.

Hope you like them if you ever check them out. Cheers!


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#9 pipergale

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 12:38 PM

I have never read a paranormal series - as far as books - that actually scared me. If you guys were shaken buy any books let me know. I love to be afraid and many films and movies often fail at succeeding in this task lol.

Definately the Nightside series. It was pretty sick and twisted. I didn't sleep well for quiet some time. 

Another pretty creepy series from the YA genre would be the Spook's Apprentice series. There were some uncomfortable scenes that had me wondering where the closest bathroom was.

Hope you like them if you ever check them out. Cheers!

 

Hey. Thank you for the suggestion ;) The Nightside series? I have never heard of it. Who is the series penned by? I will be sure to check out these two suggestions. I love to be frightened by mere imagination, especially when it is someone else's delivered to mine through the medium of words :) When you say uncomfortable, what do you mean? Things like rape? I love a bit of sick and twisted, and although I don't like or agree with rape it does make for a lot of drama in stories if used correctly.


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#10 wickedshizuku27

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 10:38 PM

 

 

I have never read a paranormal series - as far as books - that actually scared me. If you guys were shaken buy any books let me know. I love to be afraid and many films and movies often fail at succeeding in this task lol.

Definately the Nightside series. It was pretty sick and twisted. I didn't sleep well for quiet some time. 

Another pretty creepy series from the YA genre would be the Spook's Apprentice series. There were some uncomfortable scenes that had me wondering where the closest bathroom was.

Hope you like them if you ever check them out. Cheers!

 

Hey. Thank you for the suggestion ;) The Nightside series? I have never heard of it. Who is the series penned by? I will be sure to check out these two suggestions. I love to be frightened by mere imagination, especially when it is someone else's delivered to mine through the medium of words :) When you say uncomfortable, what do you mean? Things like rape? I love a bit of sick and twisted, and although I don't like or agree with rape it does make for a lot of drama in stories if used correctly.

The Nightside was written by a British writer named Simon R. Green. One thing about him is that he has a love of cliches' that you eventually get used to. By at least a third of the way into the first book I was thinking, 'Dear Baby Jesus what have I gotten myself into?'

 

The Spook's Apprentice is by Joseph Delaney. No, not that type of uncomfortable. So scared that I was going to pee myself type of uncomfortable. It's mostly about a young man learning the craft of banishing and binding witches. They were terrifyingly vivid. Every witch has a new and grotesque way of killing people; deep down it just really disturbs me. The series is still ongoing, and I anticipate and dread when I read a new one. 


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#11 pipergale

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:00 AM

 

 

I have never read a paranormal series - as far as books - that actually scared me. If you guys were shaken buy any books let me know. I love to be afraid and many films and movies often fail at succeeding in this task lol.

Definately the Nightside series. It was pretty sick and twisted. I didn't sleep well for quiet some time. 

Another pretty creepy series from the YA genre would be the Spook's Apprentice series. There were some uncomfortable scenes that had me wondering where the closest bathroom was.

Hope you like them if you ever check them out. Cheers!

 

Hey. Thank you for the suggestion ;) The Nightside series? I have never heard of it. Who is the series penned by? I will be sure to check out these two suggestions. I love to be frightened by mere imagination, especially when it is someone else's delivered to mine through the medium of words :) When you say uncomfortable, what do you mean? Things like rape? I love a bit of sick and twisted, and although I don't like or agree with rape it does make for a lot of drama in stories if used correctly.

The Nightside was written by a British writer named Simon R. Green. One thing about him is that he has a love of cliches' that you eventually get used to. By at least a third of the way into the first book I was thinking, 'Dear Baby Jesus what have I gotten myself into?'

 

The Spook's Apprentice is by Joseph Delaney. No, not that type of uncomfortable. So scared that I was going to pee myself type of uncomfortable. It's mostly about a young man learning the craft of banishing and binding witches. They were terrifyingly vivid. Every witch has a new and grotesque way of killing people; deep down it just really disturbs me. The series is still ongoing, and I anticipate and dread when I read a new one. 

 

Hmmmm. That author's's name looks a little bit familiar. it doesn't sound familiar when I say it, but i feel like I have read the name somewhere else before. Strange. I write myself and I have been looking out for some new fiction that could bring me along on how to write even more vividly, so the Spook's Apprentice by Joseph Delaney seems just perfect and ideal, especially if the book is scary. Love being scared!!!


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#12 wickedshizuku27

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 09:34 PM

You might be thinking of Chris D'Lacey, author of the Last Dragon Chronicles. I made the same presumption until I looked it up. I felt like a chuckle-headed nim-come-poop afterwards. Their writing styles in those series are polar opposites. 

I was also thinking that you just might like the Pendragon series by D.J. McHale. It's a little dated, and finished a few years ago. Though it isn't very scary, it is excellent for descriptive world building settings and wringing emotion out of readers. 


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#13 pipergale

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 11:42 PM

You might be thinking of Chris D'Lacey, author of the Last Dragon Chronicles. I made the same presumption until I looked it up. I felt like a chuckle-headed nim-come-poop afterwards. Their writing styles in those series are polar opposites. 

I was also thinking that you just might like the Pendragon series by D.J. McHale. It's a little dated, and finished a few years ago. Though it isn't very scary, it is excellent for descriptive world building settings and wringing emotion out of readers. 

 

Wow; you are just a library of knowledge and suggestions when it comes to books. Thank you so much :) I don;t read actual official fiction nearly as much as I used to. I have, over the years, limited my reading to that of fiction that every day people write and just upload to the internet. But when I need inspiration. I usually have to read a couple of official books and get a feel for the tone and writing style, and then I take a little piece from all of them.


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#14 wickedshizuku27

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:51 PM

 

You might be thinking of Chris D'Lacey, author of the Last Dragon Chronicles. I made the same presumption until I looked it up. I felt like a chuckle-headed nim-come-poop afterwards. Their writing styles in those series are polar opposites. 

I was also thinking that you just might like the Pendragon series by D.J. McHale. It's a little dated, and finished a few years ago. Though it isn't very scary, it is excellent for descriptive world building settings and wringing emotion out of readers. 

 

Wow; you are just a library of knowledge and suggestions when it comes to books. Thank you so much :) I don;t read actual official fiction nearly as much as I used to. I have, over the years, limited my reading to that of fiction that every day people write and just upload to the internet. But when I need inspiration. I usually have to read a couple of official books and get a feel for the tone and writing style, and then I take a little piece from all of them.

Yes I can assure you that my local librarian hates me. Thanks for the compliment. 


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#15 Ruth B

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 04:41 PM

I am loving reading this thread.  I have not heard of some of these.  This is one of my favorite genre's.  It can be hard to find them in movies without gore, but I did find Midnight Bayou several years ago.  

 

I also got it for a kindle book for my ipad.  I went on with life, and forgot I had it!  Thanks so much for the thread.  It reminded me.

 

Midnight Bayou is written by Nora Roberts.  Since she writes romance, I would never have noticed it if it had not been for the movie first.  It has ghosts, and some really fun metaphysical stuff with reincarnation, etc. It is a great little paranormal story. 

 

I may not enjoy romance books, but I do tend to like even love them if one of them is a ghost.  :)


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#16 pipergale

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 01:36 AM

 

 

You might be thinking of Chris D'Lacey, author of the Last Dragon Chronicles. I made the same presumption until I looked it up. I felt like a chuckle-headed nim-come-poop afterwards. Their writing styles in those series are polar opposites. 

I was also thinking that you just might like the Pendragon series by D.J. McHale. It's a little dated, and finished a few years ago. Though it isn't very scary, it is excellent for descriptive world building settings and wringing emotion out of readers. 

 

Wow; you are just a library of knowledge and suggestions when it comes to books. Thank you so much :) I don;t read actual official fiction nearly as much as I used to. I have, over the years, limited my reading to that of fiction that every day people write and just upload to the internet. But when I need inspiration. I usually have to read a couple of official books and get a feel for the tone and writing style, and then I take a little piece from all of them.

Yes I can assure you that my local librarian hates me. Thanks for the compliment. 

 

Lmaaooo. My librarian hates me too, but that is mostly because I never shut the hell up!!!! :P


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#17 Faemonic

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 03:15 PM

Right now, I'm reading the October Daye series by Seanan McGuire. It's basically a hard-boiled paranormal detective in California with Fairies, so that can appeal to fans of the Dresden Files.

 

Then again, I haven't read the Dresden Files but I really should because that sounds like something that I'd just really enjoy.

 

I've just finished reading Catherynne Valente's first Fairyland book, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making, if that counts. It's gotten me back into the modern fairy tales where some kid goes on some otherworldly sort of adventure, like Peter and Wendy, Alice in Wonderland, and I guess in some reverse version through adult eyes-- The Little Prince.


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#18 pipergale

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 11:12 PM

I am not really into detective type of stories unless they are REALLY good. To me - I don't know - I find them kind of cliche unless done exceptionally well. The best kind of horror when it comes to both book and film is to psychologically freak the reader out. Monsters don't cut it once you are past a certain age.


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#19 wickedshizuku27

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 10:31 PM

Right now, I'm reading the October Daye series by Seanan McGuire. It's basically a hard-boiled paranormal detective in California with Fairies, so that can appeal to fans of the Dresden Files.

 

Then again, I haven't read the Dresden Files but I really should because that sounds like something that I'd just really enjoy.

 

I've just finished reading Catherynne Valente's first Fairyland book, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making, if that counts. It's gotten me back into the modern fairy tales where some kid goes on some otherworldly sort of adventure, like Peter and Wendy, Alice in Wonderland, and I guess in some reverse version through adult eyes-- The Little Prince.

You might be interested in The Hollow Kingdom trilogy by Calre B. Dunkle or even The Child Thief by Brom.



I am not really into detective type of stories unless they are REALLY good. To me - I don't know - I find them kind of cliche unless done exceptionally well. The best kind of horror when it comes to both book and film is to psychologically freak the reader out. Monsters don't cut it once you are past a certain age.

Heeeeellllllllllllllllllloooooooooooooo! It's been a while.

I've got two great ones for you. Hounded by Kevin Hearn and Soulless Gail Carriger.


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#20 Livvvy

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:27 AM

I am not really into detective type of stories unless they are REALLY good. To me - I don't know - I find them kind of cliche unless done exceptionally well. The best kind of horror when it comes to both book and film is to psychologically freak the reader out. Monsters don't cut it once you are past a certain age.

Well that's sort of what Monsters do. At a younger age, they're psychologically freaking you out because what if they're under your bed, in the closet? As you grow older, you know that's not true. So it's got to be better than that, and try and convince you that there's real monsters out there. 


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